About me

Karen Winters' daily artblog.

If you have a question or or would like to find out if a painting is available for sale..... Write Me

Yes, I enjoy painting on commission and welcome your inquiry.

All material © 2005-2010 Karen Winters. All rights reserved. Do not copy.

 

  My items on eBay
Now on Ebay
 

Search

Recently Sold

Little
 
Sherwin
 
Tejon
 
Eaton
 
High
 
Will
 
Crystal
 
Central
 
baseball
 
Pasadena
 
Tournament
 
Heritage
 
Avila
 
A
 
Descanso
 
San
 
Moonstone
 
Mission
 
SLO
 
Windblown
 
Carpinteria
 
Carpinteria
 
Moonstone
 
Moonstone
 
When
 
Golden
 
Small
 
Drifters
 
Sycamore
 
Moonstone
 
Blustery
 
Capistrano
 
Lancaster
 
Casa
 
Paso
 
Vineyard
 
Terranea
 
Indian
 
Sierra
 
Sierra
 
California
 
Bishop
 
Bishop
 
Bishop
 
Bishop
 
Laguna
 
Peaceful
 
Two
 
Laguna
 
The
 
Along
 

Blog

Categories

Archives

Calendar

January 2009
M T W T F S S
« Dec   Feb »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

How to subscribe to this blog


 

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner



 

Recent Comments:

  • tony hawk games mac: I am really inspired together with your writing abilities as neatly as with the format to your...
  • Mitzi Cochran: What is the price point on this piece? It’s just beautiful!! You are incredibly talented!!
  • Molly: Absolutely brilliant – I felt transported!
  • grazia traverso: complimenti – quadri bellissimi!
  • Karen: Thanks, Annie!
  • Annie: My kind of place. My kind of smaller stream. My kind of lights touching up some rocks and grasses and leaves...
  • Karen: Thank you, Barbara

Links

Webrings

Blogs Illustrated
Join | List | Previous | Next | Random

Daily Painters Webring
Join | List | Next | Previous | Random
alt-webring.com

Arroyo Seco Path – California watercolor sketch

January 6th, 2009

Arroyo Seco Path
7″ x 5.5″ watercolor sketch


For more information about my work, please write

One of the most frequent questions I get about my paintings is whether they are all done plein air style (no) and, if not, what I use for reference. Although I do use photos to catch specific details of trees and structures, especially when painting architecture, one of my most valuable tools is my sketchbook. Because my roots are in watercolor, I usually do plein air sketches using that medium. This is a quick way to get color notes and the general layout of a landscape subject without having to fuss with too much detail.

General color areas are indicated with a quick wash. The colors of the shadows can be added when those are dry (and outdoors, watercolor dries fast!)

Using watercolor as a plein air medium has a long history among 19th century painters, and noteworthy is John Constable. His field work formed the basis for his later oil paintings. Eugene Delacroix followed the same practice.

Watercolor painting has the benefit of being quick and portable, and it is a good way to capture the mood with few strokes. Although I love plein air oil painting and do it as often as I can, it’s not always easy to set up an easel. But a watercolor sketchbook can be opened and put to use in a few minutes. A portable watercolor palette, a spray bottle, a collapsible water bucket and a few brushes, some paper towels and I’m good to go. And I can carry a kit in the car so it’s handy at any opportunity.

5 Comments »

  1. Your sketches are beautiful.

    Comment by Greg — January 6, 2009 @ 7:50 pm
  2. I love to have the time to do quick WC sketches,(dosn’t happen often enough) My favorite new tool for instant sketching is the Aquaflo brush with the water chamber in the handle.
    The new challange should be fun, I hope to do more of them this year!

    Comment by Lyn — January 7, 2009 @ 10:55 am
  3. I love the looseness of your watercolors…
    Someday I AM going to try to work at some for a bit…
    Be well!

    Comment by Marian Fortunati — January 7, 2009 @ 1:46 pm
  4. I am constantly impressed by not only your productivity and drive but also the quality of your output. this watercolor, as well as “Owens River – A good day for fishing” above are good examples. On “Arroyo Seco Path,” those muted colors are not only sufficiently realistic but also quite lovely, and of course work together. Plus you are a frequent reminder to me not to yield to the temptation so soften too many edges. On “Owens…” your usual good Autumn coloring. In this one I like especially the subtle but effective aerial perspective. And, I can “hear the water.”

    Comment by Bill — January 8, 2009 @ 12:01 pm
  5. I found your website by googling “watercolor landscape sketching” and your paintings are wonderfully beautiful. Living in Pasadena, they are particularly nice. I’m working on my own technique of sketching in watercolor to eventually paint in oil. I’m relatively new to landscapes (mostly studied figures) but want to explore this because I’d like to create some paintings for my home.

    Comment by Kathleen Donaldson — October 9, 2011 @ 7:03 pm

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a comment